container port

Guidelines Published to help reduce Container fire risk

A container shipping group, set up to increase safety levels in the industry following a string of sometimes fatal box ship fires, has produced its first set of guidelines to help operators prevent further incidents.

The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) today published Safety Considerations for Ship Operators Related to Risk-Based Stowage of Dangerous Goods on Containerships, specifically in response to “a number of serious fire incidents in recent years, often caused by deficiencies in cargo declaration and cargo packing”.

A copy of the publication can be downloaded here.

CINS chairman Uffe Ernst-Frederiksen said: “Cargo-related incidents which result in fire and explosions are rooted in cargo problems. Subsequent investigations demonstrate a wide range of deficiencies relating to cargo presented for shipment.

“These deficiencies include erroneous classification and declaration, packing, segregation and securing, not complying with IMDG or not following the CTU Code and packaging not complying with IMDG. This new best-practice guidance for DG stowage is intended to help improve fire safety in our industry,” he added.

The group stressed that the guidelines “complement – but do not replace – the existing measures already developed and implemented by ship operators for the carriage of properly declared dangerous goods. Likewise, they do not replace the SOLAS and IMDG requirements for stowage and segregation – in fact, they will enhance the requirements of these regulations”.

Investigations into deadly fires on board containerships in recent years have demonstrated that there is a class of cargo which, although not classed as dangerous goods, is thought to have increased the severity of some of the fires.

“Such commodities include, but are not limited to, charcoal, wood pellets, metal scrap, borings, shavings, turnings and seed cake,” advises the publication, which also includes stowage plan strategies to mitigate the risk of this type of cargo escalating a blaze into a severe fire.

CINS was established in in 2011 and its board comprises five of the world’s largest container shipping lines – Maersk, Hapag Lloyd, MSC, CMA CGM and Evergreen – together with three advisory board members, International Group of P&I Clubs, TT Club and Exis Technologies.

Its membership comprises over 85% of the world’s container slot capacity.

Source: The Loadstar

emissions

IMO have a lack of urgency to clear up shipping

The IMO has decided on a goal-setting approach by member states to decarbonise shipping, rather than progress the proposals put forward by some members for a mandatory speed reduction on vessels.

The strategy, decided last week in London, not to opt for speed restrictions has angered the members of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC) who blasted the IMO for its “bureaucracy” and “lack of urgency”.

An IMO working group agreed a draft text that will be put forward to the next Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) meeting in March.

The text urges member states to develop and update a voluntary national action plan, which includes an improvement in the domestic and legislative implementation of existing regulations and a commitment to develop activities to further enhance the energy efficiency of ships, along with initiating the research and the uptake of alternative low- and zero-carbon fuels.

The IMO said that during the working group sessions “a number of proposals were discussed”, including an Energy Efficiency Ship Index (EEXI), mandatory power limitations on ships, measures to optimise speed on a voyage and speed limiters.

According to the UK Chamber of Shipping,“after lengthy discussions it was clear that there was no appetite for prescriptive speed reduction regulation”.

However, the UK Chamber, which is against the implementation of speed restrictions on shipping, arguing among other things that it would require more ships to be built with ‘old’ technology to take up the slack, said there was a “positive outcome” from the meeting.

Shipping policy director Anna Ziou said: “The progress made sets the right direction of travel and is a good foundation for the IMO’s work to put the strategy into action.”

Meanwhile, the CSC said measures were “urgently needed” if the IMO’s plan, agreed in April last year to half emissions from shipping by 2050 was to be met.

Bill Hemmings, shipping director of CSC member, transport & environment, said: “Time is running short but that’s not the feeling you get inside the room. The commitment last April to agree and implement in the short-term immediate emissions reduction measures has fallen foul of procedure, bureaucracy and delay spearheaded by countries that were never really on board.”

Mr Hemmings named the key member states as the US, Saudi Arabia and Brazil that “spearheaded” the movement against mandatory speed restrictions.

And John Maggs, senior policy advisor at fellow CSC member Seas at Risk, was equally damming of the IMO’s decision not to implement vessel speed restrictions at this time.

“Ships have deployed slow-steaming over the past decade in a way that has seen dramatic reductions in emissions. The world is not blind to this,” said Mr Maggs.

He said that the speeds of ships “must initially be capped” and “then progressively lowered” and suggested that the “commitment of many at the IMO to genuinely reduce ship emissions” was absent.

Nevertheless, several shipowners and operators The Loadstar has spoken to in recent weeks argued that they were already operating their vessels at the lowest speeds recommended by engine manufacturers, in order to conserve fuel and cut voyage costs to the bone.

Indeed, one executive from a major container carrier said: “Our masters are under strict instructions not to ‘put their foot down’ unless it is a matter of safety; if we miss a berth window so be it, we have a network that can adjust to that and it is generally cheaper than burning the extra fuel.”

Source: The Loadstar

Ghana Outlook

Supreme Charity Work – Maths Textbooks Arrive Safely

The maths textbooks which we sent to our charity Ghana Outlook have arrived safely!

The books will be going to a school in the community of Abordahi, near Ho in the Volta Region of Ghana. It is a very deprived community where GO has spent time and effort in raising the aspiration of the community and its children. They have built three schools that cover the full age range of the children plus a teacher’s accommodation block, each with its own latrine and safe water supply.

If you know a charity that could benefit from our help please contact us…

Ghana Outlook

 

solent 250

Supreme in the Solent 250

We are very proud to announce that we are again featured in the Solent 250 – and this year we are in the top 50!

The Solent 250 is the annual ranking compiled by The Business Magazine, and as a Solent 250 company we have been invited to Christmas Drinks and Canapes at the Harbour Hotel in Southampton, where guest speaker, Simon Hart from RSM will share his observations on the current global economic climate and his insights and predictions for 2020.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all our wonderful members of staff and our loyal customers for your support this year, and look forward to an even higher position next year!

To view the full list please go here:

https://www.businessmag.co.uk/solent-250-2020/