Singapore port

Singapore is ranked as the best shipping centre for 5th consecutive year

Singapore has topped the 2018 International Shipping Centre Development (ISCD) Index as the world’s best shipping centre for the fifth year in a row, beating cities including Hong Kong, Shanghai and London.

The index, which was published by the Baltic Exchange and Chinese news agency Xinhua, ranks 43 of the largest ports and cities in the world and serves as a guide for investors and governments on the most important shipping hubs.

Four of the top 10 ports are located in the Asia-Pacific region and three of them ranked in the top four spots. Singapore reached the highest place, thanks to its participation in the Maritime Silk Road initiative, which aims to strengthen connectivity and cooperation between Eurasian countries. Within this framework, customs procedures in Singapore, Hong Kong and the United Arab Emirates all performed efficiently.

Hong Kong overtook London to take second place for the first time in five years, while Shanghai was ranked as the fourth best shipping centre, thanks to its modern shipping logistics and services systems, as well as the development of its regional shipping counterparts.

“These shipping centres capitalise on their locations in developed shipping markets to provide comprehensive shipping services with abundant logistics and transportation support,” the study said. “Playing the role of international shipping hubs servicing a myriad of maritime trade routes and air flights, their development is buoyed by financial momentum from international economies and trades.”

Some of the major European centres dropped in the ranking due to the region’s overall weak economy: London fell one place to third; Hamburg came in seventh; and Athens was replaced by Busan in the tenth spot.

Rotterdam, however, gained two places to reach sixth, thanks to its improved operating efficiency and advancements in data gathering, artificial intelligence and other technology applications.

London retained first place (ahead of Singapore) as best centre for shipping services, a category that evaluates ports based on services covering ship broking, ship engineering, shipping business, ship repair, as well as maritime legal services and shipping finance services. The UK capital was also the centre with the highest number of maritime arbitrators, at 400, well ahead of Singapore in second place with 50-60.

Baltic Exchange CEO Mark Jackson said: “This report underlines the constant competition and innovation taking place in cities around the world to attract maritime related businesses. Location is an important ingredient for success in the shipping industry and plays an important part in meeting the latest challenges.”

Source: ShipTechnology.com

HMRC

We are CDS compliant

HMRC has successfully implemented the first software release for its new Customs Declaration Service (CDS).

Supreme Freight Services are CDS compliant – we can assist importers in a complete consultation ahead of the CDS implementation.

This new Customs Declaration Service will deliver a modern system for importers and exporters who have to complete customs declarations when trading outside the EU.

CDS will replace the existing Customs Handling of Import and Export Freight (CHIEF) system over three phases between August 2018 and early 2019. The new system will meet the requirements of the Union Customs Code (UCC), support the anticipated future import and export growth of the UK, and provide businesses with access to more of their customs information in one place.

Following implementation of the first release of CDS this week on 14 August, a selected group of importers will start making certain types of supplementary declarations on CDS. The majority of importers will start using CDS from November, once their own software provider or in-house IT team has completed development of CDS-compatible software. Exporters will follow after this. CHIEF will continue to operate in parallel while the transition of traders takes place.

Kevin Franklin, HMRC’s Customs Transformation Programme Director, said: “The first release of the new Customs Declaration Service is a major milestone. Going live on time is a great step to fully introducing the new system and is testament to the hard work of both HMRC staff and our partners.  We have been engaging closely with trade representatives including software developers, Community System Providers, freight forwarders, and traders themselves about CDS and we value the support from these organisations in preparing importers and exporters for the upcoming changes. Our priority now is to make sure software developers, agents and their clients are ready and we will continue to work closely with them throughout the transition.”

When fully rolled out, CDS will offer several new and existing services all in one place, and due to requirements of the UCC, some additional information will need to be collected and included in import and export declarations. This means importers, exporters and agents will need to work with their in-house or external software developers to understand the impact these changes will have on their businesses.

The changes for exports will be available on GOV.UK later in the year.

Please contact us at your earliest convenience for assistance.

Source: Gov.uk

climate change

Shipping is delivering on climate change

In a piece written for the Parliament Magazine, Violeta Bulc, the European mobility and transport Commissioner explained how the international shipping sector is doing its part to contribute to global climate change efforts.

Below are her thoughts:

In April, more than 100 countries agreed on an initial strategy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shipping at the International Maritime Organisation (IMO).

This was a significant achievement for the EU and its member states, which played an instrumental role in brokering and securing the agreement with international partners.

The agreement is another example of the EU becoming a stronger global actor to spur substantive and credible climate action. By defining an objective of at least 50 per cent GHG reductions by 2050, compared with 2008 levels, international shipping has become the first industry sector to agree globally on an absolute emission reduction aim.

The agreement also comes with a comprehensive list of potential reduction measures, including short-term measures. Undoubtedly, the IMO and the shipping sector were indispensable in setting this precedent. Yet reaching this agreement was no easy feat.

I had the opportunity to be part of the discussions and to interact with some of the key parties during the first day of the negotiations that led to this remarkable outcome. I met with EU member states representatives, who, despite some initial divergence on negotiating tactics back in Brussels, entered the discussions on solid and ambitious grounds.

I am proud to say that, following EU coordination and throughout the negotiations, the member states remained united and played a pivotal role in gathering the required political support during the negotiations.

Four MEPs – José Ignacio Faria , Dubravka Šuica, Jytte Guteland and Bas Eickhout – who engaged in many side meetings at the IMO, also supported the EU delegation.

“The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) agreement is another example of the EU becoming a stronger global actor to spur substantive and credible climate action”

The outcome was also aided by good cooperation of many EU member states with other like-minded partners including several Pacific Islands States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Mexico. The Marshall Islands for instance – one of the world’s biggest flag states and a remote small island state – are heavily impacted by climate change.

Their population is facing increasing difficulties in growing crops and drilling for drinking water, as increased floods increase salinity. Bridging the gap between positions on key issues such as emission reduction objectives and guiding principles of the strategy required a negotiation effort.

Several major flag states questioned whether it was appropriate to set a number for the emission reduction objective before data on fuel consumption and emissions become available. Their reticence was dispelled by the industry representatives, who publicly voiced the sector’s readiness to accept numbers as indicative targets for reductions in the future.

Many developing countries expressed concerns over the possible impacts of new emission reduction measures, for example, on their trade. To address such concerns, the Commission, the EU member states and MEPs present reaffirmed, in their outreach meetings that the EU is willing to consider further capacity building and technical cooperation to assist implementing future measures.

“I am proud to say that, following EU coordination and throughout the negotiations, the member states remained united and played a pivotal role in gathering the required political support during the negotiations”

Therefore I am pleased to see that the EU-funded, IMO-managed project which led to the establishment of the maritime technologies cooperation centres network was expressly acknowledged in the strategy as a capacity building project.

This is an example to others, including international financial institutions. Crucial factors in brokering the deal were the tireless efforts of IMO Secretary General, Kitack Lim, in encouraging inclusiveness and consensus in the discussions.

With this support in the background, the resolute chairmanships of Sveinung Oftedal of Norway, the Chair of the working group on reduction of GHG emissions from ships, along with Hideaki Saito, the Chair of the marine environment protection committee, made it possible to draw a line and build upon the support of the overwhelming majority of the IMO States present.

Not everyone was fully on board with the text of the adopted IMO strategy. The US, following on their recently announced plans to withdraw from the Paris agreement, and Saudi Arabia, given what the prospect of decarbonisation may mean for their main export product. Both expressed formal reservations to the adoption of the IMO strategy.

While the strenuous negotiations at MEPC 72 delivered a result that kept the IMO in the driving seat for defining an emissions agenda for international shipping, the real work, developing and adopting reduction measures, starts only now.

The full cooperation of both the EU and also all IMO member states is needed to agree on short-term measures with immediate emission reduction effects before 2023. Preparations on longer term actions should also begin.

Bulc ends with stating that she is optimistic that shipping is delivering its share to the global climate change efforts under the Paris agreement and the EU institutions are determined to strive for ambitious objectives, and continue the effective cooperation with our partners.

Global climate change is always a contentious issue, trade is on the rise again globally, and ships are back trawling our seas, connecting places and people. However, ships don’t just drive trade, they unfortunately contribute to climate change too in fact, global shipping is responsible for about 2.5% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and these are projected to rise by between 50% and 250% by 2050 if nothing improves.

Source: Parliament Magazine / Medium.com

cosco

Mega Containership Equipped with ABB Turbochargers

China’s newest and largest container ship has ABB turbochargers installed to help to ensure optimal performance and fuel efficiency. 

The flagship in Cosco Shipping Line’s Universe mega containership series, the 21,000+ TEU COSCO Shipping Universe, was delivered in June 2018 by Chinese shipbbuilder Jiangnan Shipyard (Group) Co. Ltd. The vessel is equipped with three ABB A180-L two-stroke turbochargers to match the diesel main engine and four ABB TPL67-C33 4-stroke turbochargers to match four auxiliary engines.

Cosco, the largest container shipping operator in Asia and fourth largest globally, already has hundreds of ABB turbochargers in operation across its fleet and has also selected the equipment for all main and auxiliary engines across the six new 21,000+ TEU vessels being delivered by 2019.

At a capacity of 21,237 TEU, COSCO Shipping Universe has eclipsed the record for China’s largest containership set weeks prior by a different Cosco Lines vessel, the Cosco Shipping Virgo. The pioneering vessel has an overall length of 399.9 meters and an overall height of 72 meters, with a deadweight of 198,000 tons and a traveling speed of 22 knots. Cosco Shipping Universe is planned to serve in the route from the Far East to Northwest Europe.

Oliver Riemenschneider, Managing Director, ABB Turbocharging, said, “The ABB turbochargers on Cosco Shipping Universe will support maximum performance and fuel efficiency, in addition to contributing to Cosco Shipping Lines pursuing green shipping practices for long-term success. We foresee the ABB turbochargers on the forthcoming mega containerships in the Universe series will contribute similar viable operational gains.”

According to the manufacturer, key benefits for ABB’s A100 series include compliance with IMO Tier II and Tier III emission limits; reduced fuel consumption; high operational flexibility, reliability and availability; long intervals between inspections, routine maintenance and overhauls; absolute operational safety with rigorous testing and reduced engine room noise.

The TPL-C series, respectively, is designed to meet growing market demand for greater power, efficiency and long operational life, ABB said. In addition to its fuel savings and low emissions capabilities, the TPL-C series boasts a modular design with minimized spare parts for easy installation and service.

ABB Turbocharging also provides servicing support for all ABB turbochargers in use across the Cosco Shipping Lines fleet. The firm provides access to 24/7 servicing, 365 days a year, and guaranteed 98 percent spare parts availability.

Source: Marinelink.com