sea freight

Shipping Construction Goods Worldwide

Shipping goods via sea freight internationally happens on a daily basis and enables us to obtain products from anywhere in the world with ease. You could say that shipping keeps world trade turning particularly for the construction industry.

The recent incident of the sea freight ship getting stuck in the Suez Canal may have prompted you to consider what goes into transporting construction products all over the world.

If you have ever considered setting up a shipping business of your own or extending your current business to offer this service, read on for a few things to consider.

1. What Products will you be Shipping

When creating a freight business, it is important to consider the items you will be shipping and the current demand for these them around the world. Identifying gaps in the market and establishing how your business can fill these gaps is an ideal way of establishing yourself in the shipping industry. New construction projects are started each day. The question is how is your business going to find them?

2. How will Products be Stored and Accessed

Businesses in the freight industry mostly own warehouses situated in various locations. Warehouse provide companies with storage solutions particularly when packing orders for shipping. It is important to consider the locations of your warehouses particularly when dealing with products significant in size like those of the construction industry.

3. The Legal Side to Opening a Freight Business

Once products and warehouse locations have been sorted, it’s time to focus of the legalities of your business. It is imperative that the relevant permits and licenses are acquired not to mention implementing insurance polices that will protect from potential issues and ensure that your business can trade effectively. One of the first policies to consider is contents insurance. The last thing that businesses want to consider are damage to stock resulting major losses.

4. Building a Customer Base

One of the hardest things in starting a business is increasing your retention and ensuring your customers are talking about you. Initially this can be challenging. Offering discounts and rewarding loyal customers will incentivise customers to return increasing your chances of achieving maximum profits!

How Sea Freight Works

Companies use freight companies for their extensive knowledge of importing and customs processes. Processes can be complex and mistakes are costly to fix. Having a shipping company taking the reins ensures that shipments get to their intended location as smoothly as possible.

Companies arranging a shipment to be transported usually go through the following process:

  • Find a shipping company and negotiate the price of the shipment
  • Collection of the goods from the supplier to the shipping company
  • Transferring the shipment from the port and into Customs
  • Goods are loaded into either FCL or LCL containers and loaded onto a cargo ship
  • On arrival in to the UK, the shipment is met by customs and released on receipt of duty paid
  • Delivery of the goods to their final destination.

Sea freight shipments are not hard to arrange assuming the shipping company is reputable and cost-effective. When ensuring shipments reach their final destination in good time, planning and organisation are required. Despite all of this sea freight is still the most cost-effective way of shipping goods all around the world.

What are the Advantages of Sea Freight?

There are many advantages to using sea freight to import your shipments. These include:

  • Cost – Businesses looking to import shipments significant in size and in large quantities find sea freight one of the most cost-effective ways to transport it. Sea freight has been known to be 4- 6 times cheaper than air freight. Additionally, taxes are calculated in a different way to air freight keeping the costs down in other ways.
  • The different options available with sea freight could suit a number of businesses. Sharing containers spreads the cost between companies.
  • Sea freight importing does not have as many restrictions of what companies can import, in terms of size and amount as other methods do. Bigger items such as furniture or vehicles isn’t going to be so much of a problem by sea as it would by air.
  • Sea freight is pretty much accessible from anywhere in the world.
  • Sea freight importing is much better for the environment than other methods.
Freight

Suez Canal Blockage Means Challenging Month For Forwarders and Ports

Ocean ports and freight forwarders are bracing for a challenging month as the aftermath of the Suez Canal blockage reaches Europe and Asia affecting space, equipment and other parts of the supply chain.

Ocean ports and freight forwarders are bracing for a challenging month as the aftermath of the Suez Canal blockage reaches Europe and Asia affecting space, equipment and other parts of the supply chain.

Analysis published by Sea-Intelligence indicated that the main impact of the blockage would last until early June, in terms of liner schedules on the Asia-Europe services. Freight sources are already reporting of some European ports filling up as container lines, that had been delayed due to the blockage, discharge cargo wherever they can in order to turn ships around as quickly as possible and return them to Asia. It is suggested that this practice is being prioritised over European export cargo.

Freight forwarder Flexport highlighted in its recent market update that there had been increased rates imposed on Asia-Europe services from most carriers in the form of GRIs from 15 April “as a result of tight space and equipment due to Suez Canal situation.”
The forwarder recommended at least 21 days booking notice prior to the cargo ready date for Asia-Europe services. Flexport added that the ripple effect from the Suez Canal blockage “will become very visible in the next few weeks, with quite a number of blank sailings from Ocean Alliance and The Alliance.” It added that capacity was “severely reduced in weeks 16, 17, 19 and 21, noting that the “equipment shortage has become very serious again, especially out of Shanghai and outports. Both space and equipment will be very challenging in the coming month.”
They reported similar findings on the services from Asia to the East Coast of the US which was impacted by Suez Canal capacity issues and had also seen a GRI on 15 April.
Flexport also added that carriers were now “starting to look ahead to the 2021 contract year in the midst of extreme challenges to the USEC and inland locations. Premium remains the entry point to the market on almost all lanes. Transloading services are becoming more essential to avoid challenges to the USEC.”

Flexport noted that Europe-North American routes were also severely impacted with a GRI implemented on 15 April and another likely from 1 May. It recommended advanced booking notice of at least 5 days prior to cargo ready date. This market was “expected to remain dynamic through Q2 as capacity stays heavily constrained,” urging customers that, “booking early is key to securing space. Use premium products for the urgent cargo needing higher reliability.”

Port of Felixstowe Operational Update

In a weekend update from the Port of Felixstowe, it stressed that they were currently “fully operational,” adding: “This week will be very busy s vessels delayed and diverted due to the recent Suez Canal blockage arrive at the same time as scheduled vessels, although no significant delays are expected.
“To help manage the extra volume, extended Sunday opening hours for collection and delivery of containers will be available up to and including Sunday, 9th May.”
European intermodal operators have reported congestion at some European container ports with wait times for the handling of barges taking 41 hours in Antwerp and 34 hours in Rotterdam. As a result of this European freight forwarders have outlined preparations in anticipation of the challenging weeks ahead.

Forwarders Make Preparations

Norman Global Logistics mentioned last week that it was anticipating congestion in North European major ports that were likely to reach critical levels over the next four weeks as terminals try to work through the backlog of fully laden ships. They noted that some lines had stopped taking new bookings entirely for the moment.

The company was block-booking delivery resources in an attempt to clear the containers as quickly as possible after the vessels arrived. “Our ops teams are working tirelessly to keep supply chains optimised and all NGL customers can use the live tracking links on their daily nForm shipment report to see status summaries and precisely where their shipments are.”

Metro Shipping, a UK freight forwarder last week explained that lockdown restrictions easing in England attributed to predictions of a steep rise in sales with data confirming that consumer confidence was at an all-time high.
“And with global supply chains likely to suffer ‘Suez related’ disruption for several months, orders will need to be expedited and replenishment assured, using a blend of modal and transit options, if they are to maximise the revenue potential of this opportunity.”

Potential Delays Due to Suez Canal Blockage

Metro Shipping reported that although lines such as Maersk had reopened its online bookings for spot shipments and short-term contracts, bookings could only be accepted subject to port capacity and equipment availability.

They added: “The hope is that the post-Suez impact on ports in Europe and the UK will pass quickly, but shippers should expect delays and equipment shortages at Asian ports to continue, because we have already missed two weeks in terms of getting equipment back to Asia. Asian ports will feel the effects of the Suez disruption far more, with schedules affected later in the second quarter, making it even harder for carriers to get their schedules under control and empty containers positioned to regions that need them for loading – this situation is already becoming critical again and to a similar situation experienced before Chinese New Year.”

On the Asia-North Europe trade lane, Metro said “the volatility being experienced with capacity was more significant and longer lasting than on the Mediterranean, with the full effects expected to be felt in Asia in the week beginning 24 May – over a month away, which demonstrates the longevity of the situation and time it will take to recover anything like a normal service situation.”

They also noted that “Global supply chaines will continue to be impacted by the fallout from the Suez Blockage for some weeks and possibly months,” highlighting the recent launch of a real time GPS application on its MVT supply chain visibility platform, “which is monitoring all Suez-impacted vessels, with consignment view to SKU level.”
Metro added: “We are flexing, updating and adding alternative solutions and recoveries, across all modes of transport and geographies to keep supply chains fully functioning.” It said that interest in its air freight services had increase massively as a solution to ocean freight delays encouraging shippers to contact the company without delay if they are looking to critically import or export pending Asia shipments.

Containers

£40 Million Investment in Southampton

DP World have announced that Southampton, Britain’s second largest container terminal, will be benefitting from a major investment which will raise its significance as a premier international freight and logistics hub.

DP World Southampton is a part of DP World and a leading global provider of smart logistics. One of their two UK deep water ports were awarded Freeport status by the government last month. The new £40 million investment intended to improve infrastructure will provide customers with increased speed, security, reliability and flexibility. Changes to infrastructure will include:

  • Dredging and widening of the berths to ensure accommodation of the world’s largest ships. With the partnership of Associated British Ports, this project was completed before Easter and will provide flexibility for their customers with immediate effect.
  • An investment in a new class of eleven hybrid straddle carriers totalling £10million. The vehicles are used to lift containers moved by the quay cranes and then service onward forms of transport via road and rail. This new class of machines will be the most sustainable in the world consuming up to 40% less fuel than its diesel-electric counterparts.
  • Currently £3m is planned to be invested in the redevelopment of the yard for the storage and delivery of empty customer containers. This will increase capacity of the yard by 25% on completion, creating more flexibility for port users.
  • A new Border Control Post (BCP) which includes UK Border Force and Port Health inspection facilities. This will enable multiple government agencies to improve the time they are taking on cargo checks entering the country.
  • A £1.5m quay crane rail extension of 120 metres to ensure that all berths at the terminal will be serviced. In addition, other quay cranes will either be relocated or decommissioned to maximise efficiency, speed quayside loading and save time.

Ernst Schulze, Chief Executive of DP World in the UK said: “DP World Southampton is the most productive port in Britain, turns container trucks around faster than any of its competitors and at 30% also has the highest proportion of its containers moved by rail.”

“At DP World we think ahead to create smarter trade solutions and this £40m programme of investment will ensure that our Southampton terminal continues to grow as a major freight and logistics hub. Our aim is to partner in our customers’ business success and we are already seeing a surge of interest from companies which want to take advantage of the customs zone and tax benefits resulting from Southampton and London Gateway becoming Freeports.”

This investment into the port of Southampton is a welcome arrival to the logistics industry that has faced some gruelling battles with the COVID-19 pandemic and Britain totally breaking away from the European Union at the end of last year.

According to Logistics UK’s 2020 report the logistics industry made an astounding effort to deliver for the nation that year despite setbacks including HGV driver shortages, economic and financial hardship and significant disruption to operations.

Elizabeth de Jong, Logistic UK’s Director of Policy commented: “Despite facing significant operational and financial disruption since March 2020, the logistics industry has stepped up to ensure it continues to supply the nation with the goods it needs, including food supplies and PPE. The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted how critical our industry and its people are to the success of the economy; Logistics UK is proud of the way in which its member businesses, and the wider industry, have worked together to service the needs of the nation during this critical time.”

“To deal with the COVID-19 crisis, logistics businesses managed risks by scaling back operations, taking work back in-house and reducing their reliance on third party services; many also focused activity on their core fleet of vehicles to save costs.”

post-brexit-red-tape-for3e-trade

Post-Brexit Red Tape for EU Trade

Despite the lack of lorries at borders since the UK left the EU Single Market and Customs Union, various sources have highlighted significant disruption to goods being transported citing post-Brexit red tape as the cause. This is having a significant impact on the trading of goods with plant or animal origins.

The Scottish fishing industry have been struggling with confusion and uncertainty following the implementation of the deal agreed on Christmas Eve between the UK and EU governments. Some firms have seen major delays with some of their shipments being halted until 18th January due to issues with health checks, computer systems and customs paperwork which is leading to a big backlog as reported by the Guardian. As a result of this, many seafood shipments heading to France and Spain have been rejected because of the delay.

Due to backlog, the DFDS, the UK seafood industry’s largest logistics provider has suspended its groupage export service which allows exporters to group their shipments together in one consignment. This was decided only a week after the new trade deal was implemented. DFDS are expecting to resume deliveries next Monday but are warning that the service would be expected to take a lot longer than what it would before Brexit and is highlighting the importance of correct and accurate paperwork.

Other companies such as Danish ro-ro shipping and logistics operator have said that they endeavour to fix IT issues and provide more training to their staff to help customers complete the required customs paperwork and achieve a smoother process.

DB Schenker Faces Challenges

DB Schenker has highlighted the significant challenges it has faced relating to the introduction of the new customs formalities that now apply to shipments as a result of Brexit. Following the suit of many other providers, they have also placed a hold on all shipments being sent to the UK.

The provider has found that only 10% of customs documents submitted with shipments have been complete and free of errors. To try and manage this situation effectively the company have redeployed staff from their Brexit Task Force that was established over a year ago.

In a statement, they said: “DB Schenker expects shipping volumes to increase further in January. Logistics service providers can only process consignments quickly if the share of correct and complete customs documents also increases significantly. Both shipper and consignees need to ensure that compliant documents are provided.”

Cross border e-commerce trade expert, Hurricane Commerce warned that the struggles faced by UK businesses in the first few weeks of the new regulations being implemented are the “tip of the iceberg” and that severe challenges should be anticipated.

This comes as parcel carrier, DPD, was also forced to pause its road service from the UK to Ireland and Europe until the end of last week due to customs clearance issues with post-Brexit parcels.

Customs Clearance Staff Shortages

Another challenge that firms have desperately tried to mitigate before 31st December was the sourcing of a sufficient number of customs clerks to be trained up and ready before the implementation of the new trading regime. Speaking last Autumn, Barney Weston, managing director of Oceanic Resources International warned that serious shortage was unavoidable.

On the current situation, he said: “I think most (firms) managed to get the bulk of their teams in place before the end of the year, but training and ‘filling the gaps’ continues. In most cases a Customs and Compliance Manager/ Brexit Head is in place (in firms) giving the strategic lead on how to handle the UK’s new trading relationship.”

He went on to say: “I know that in many cases training and upskilling is on-going, and there is still high demand for people to fill customs clerk positions, but it’s hard to accurately quantify this in numbers. Certainly, anyone who has ever sniffed a customs clearance in their career history is still worth their weight in gold!”

“I think the whole industry will have a clearer picture on the situation by the end of the month; so much was unknown heading into Brexit. I think that shortly people will know if they can handle demand with the current staff levels or if more will be needed.”

“One positive; I spoke with a top 5 UK supermarket earlier this week who we have been assisting in building their customs teams, and so far, everything is working.”

 

British International Freight Association have confirmed that its freight forwarder members appear to be managing the challenges with a spokesperson for the association saying, “(Members) are learning the new systems as they go – (there were) hard lessons learnt but they are getting to grips with the situation in exceptionally difficult circumstances. BIFA has always said that the preparing and lodging of customs declarations was the relatively easy part of the new procedures, and the bigger issues would be with non-tariff matters such as safety and security entries and SPS controls. That has already been seen.”

BIFA director general, Robert Keen commented, “We receive calls asking technical questions on procedures but so far as we can gauge the members are very busy but coping.”

Another source close to BIFA said, “(Evidence) suggests that cross border trade last week was very quiet; probably because of pre 1st January stockpiling and companies waiting to see how things pan out. The people I have spoken to expect increased volumes this week, but nowhere near normal. So, we probably won’t get to see the true picture for some time. And who knows what the new normal will be?”

 

port terminal

Port terminals need to be more cost effective

Pressure is mounting on container ports to improve efficiency in terminal operations, as wholesale change in the shipping industry continues to increase competition and drive down revenue per box.

According to Mark Welles, Navis vice president and general manager Asia Pacific, terminal operators are “aggressively attacking their cost base and figuring out ways to use some of their tools to do more with less”.

This includes using automation to drive incremental changes that improve operational efficiency, whether waterside or at the terminal gate.

“Terminals are making the small or large changes they need to keep their businesses moving ahead against the challenges from consolidation on the carrier side,”

“Some terminals are handling more volume, but in some markets the revenue per teu is decreasing – or certainly not increasing the way it used to – so they’re having to manage their business in a different way.

“That efficiency drive has two parts: one is to be the better service provider [than regional port competitors]; but also to reduce your costs, which therefore either gives you more flexibility on the commercial side, or it means you’re a more profitable business,” he added.

Mr Welles was speaking after a visit to the Qingdao New Qianwan Container Terminal (QQCTN), which uses Navis N4, the port software specialist’s flagship terminal operating system (TOS).

“Full automation is working well for them and helping to set the stage for what’s possible in China and Asia, in terms of the success they’ve had,” he explained.

Navis has worked with ports to implement around 120 software “go-lives” at terminals around the world over the past two years. The port of Tianjin managed to install N4 at six terminals in less than 12 months, a feat Mr Welles described as “almost unheard of”.

The importance of a well-functioning TOS was brought into sharp focus by the IT failure experienced recently at Felixstowe. The botched installation of an in-house TOS led to prolonged operational interruptions and subsequent diverted vessel calls. The resulting supply chain disruption – which was at first contained to UK ports – has now spread to northern Europe.

It appears Hutchison, the Hong Kong port group that runs Felixstowe, was bucking a trend with the decision to develop its own TOS.

“It’s fair to say, from a macro-level, over the past five years we’ve seen more and more of the regional and global terminal groups partnering with an experienced solutions provider to ‘buy don’t build’,” said Mr Welles.

He claims ports generally prefer suppliers that provide turnkey solutions for the full spectrum of systems and equipment required for each aspect of terminal operations.

Source: The Loadstar

port of felixstowe

Felixstowe productivity improving after implementation of new operating system

The Port of Felixstowe has stated that vessel and rail loading performance remain below target but no new issues have emerged as it works on resolving slow loading and delays caused by problems with its terminal operating system (TOS).

Issues first surfaced last month when the port introduced the TOS but it confirmed in the week beginning Monday 2 July that overall quayside volume was 66,000 teus and productivity was 80% of pre go-live levels. Felixstowe added that nearly 5,000 containers were loaded to rail and over 21,000 road hauliers serviced, while average haulier turnaround times have stabilised at 46 minutes.

Confirming there has been no additional issues since its last report on 5 July and stressing its continued work to improve productivity, the port stated: “Vessel and rail loading performance remain below the targets we need to achieve. We are working to reduce further the number of rail misses and we recognise that performance in all areas is not good enough.”

Improvement initiatives

It said several initiatives have been implemented to improve yard operations and productivity, which are expected to improve vessel, rail and road loading cycles and times.

A new area for empty storage will be opened behind berths eight and nine on 14 July. The new yard will provide capacity for an additional 4,200 teus of empty storage and is designed to facilitate quicker loading of empties to outbound vessels.

“We are continuing to work closely with our shipping line customers to minimise disruption,” the port stated.

Source: Port Strategy

port of felixstowe

Port of Felixstowe orders RTGs with automation and remote control technology

The order marks an important step for Hutchison Ports, which owns and operates the Port of Felixstowe in the UK, as it rolls out automation and remote control systems on STS cranes and RTGs at a growing number of terminals around the world. Last month Felixstowe received its first two remote controlled STS cranes (ZPMC).

The new RTGs will also be built by ZPMC, with Siemens drive, control and automation systems. Siemens is also supplying “simulation, virtual commissioning” and the Remote Control Operator Stations (RCOS), plus all engineering and on-site commissioning. Siemens confirmed to WorldCargo News that the cranes will be powered by a conductor rail. Felixstowe has converted some of its existing RTG fleet to eRTGs using Vahle conductor rails.

“Port of Felixstowe is currently extending their berths 8&9 and yard capacity. The ARTGs purchased will support the additional yard capacity required. Port of Felixstowe decided in order to reduce their ecological footprint to electrify the RTG-cranes and gradually introduce automation in the yard to improve safety and competitiveness. The new cranes will be taken in operation on the new blocks under development, which allows the terminal to continue its commercial operations as usual,” Siemens said in a statement.

Siemens has been promoting the concept of using “digital twins” to simulate and test crane systems prior to delivery, to reduce commissioning time on site. This will be used at Felixstowe, plans to put the automated RTGs into operation in the first quarter of 2019, a very aggressive target.

“Using digital twins of the cranes enables various simulations, allowing for flexibility and providing us the ability to test our automation systems against a virtual crane and simulated environment and create all sorts of work-through scenarios,” said Rink Groenveld, Head of Siemens Cranes Projecthouse. “Implementation of automation modules allowing for collision prevention and automated stacking, integrated safety solutions and Remote Control will lead to safe, productive and consistent operations in the container terminal. These unique features helped Siemens to be chosen as the preferred electrical and automation partner for this important terminal.”

Source: World Cargo News 

air pollution

Ports and Shipping need to curb air pollution

RealWire, an online media presence, has this week issued a press release related to using proven existing technology to curb UK Shipping and Port Industry air pollution.

According to RealWire, providing renewable electricity to ships whilst in port in the UK could reduce the equivalent of 1.2 million diesel cars worth of nitrogen oxides pollution and bring £402 million per year of health and environmental benefits.

By plugging into the power grid with 100 per cent renewable electricity and turning off their diesel engines, ships at berth in the UK would reduce emissions equivalent to 84,000 to 166,000 diesel buses – or 1.2 million diesel cars representative of the current UK fleet.

The pressure is mounting for the UK to align with EU air pollution emission targets, and ships at berth need to cut their fuel consumption and port authorities and terminal operators need to integrate shore power capabilities in a simpler and more efficient way.

Schneider Electric supports decarbonisation through its business efforts, this has led to a sponsored study into the emissions from idling ships at berth in UK ports that affects the quality of the air we breathe. Often neglected as source of air pollution, ships spewing toxic emissions near to coastal towns and cities puts people and the environment at risk.

While road transport pollution garners public prominence because it is so visible in our everyday lives, we should not underestimate the impact that portside emissions have on the environment and the cost of keeping society healthy. Offshore supply vessels, fishing boats, roll-on-roll-off, bulk carriers and passenger ferries contribute the most to the emissions from auxiliary engines at berth. The emissions from all vessels’ auxiliary engines at berth in UK ports in 2016 is estimated to be equivalent to nearly 2.6 per cent of the total transport sector emissions of nitrogen oxides in the UK. The best estimates of these emissions from auxiliary engines are 830,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide, 11,000 tonnes of nitrogen oxides (NOx), 270 tonnes in particulate matter and 520 tonnes of sulphur dioxide.

There were approximately 110,000 buses and coaches in the UK fleet in 2016 and the study has found that ships’ auxiliary engines at berth are equivalent to the nitrogen oxides and particulate matter emissions equivalent to 84,000 to 166,000 buses and coaches representative of those currently in the UK fleet, respectively.

Dirty air has been linked to asthma symptoms, heart disease and even lung cancer. It has been linked to dementia and is also known to increase the risk of children growing up with smaller lungs. Meanwhile, 59 per cent of the UK pollution – 40 million people – live in areas where diesel pollution threatens their health, according to Friends of the Earth. Global deaths linked to ambient air pollution are estimated to have increased by just under 20 per cent since 1990, while 95 per cent of the world’s population is now breathing toxic air, according to a recent study by the 

Health Effects Institute while the Royal College of Physicians has found that air pollution in the UK contributes to 40,000 deaths per year. The UK could bypass a major health hazard as well as avoid health and environmental impacts of up to £402 million per year through the elimination of nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and particulates – using the introduction of shore connections at UK ports. If all the emissions from the auxiliary engines at berth from these vessels were reduced to zero by replacement with power from 100 per cent renewable electricity sources, the value in reducing emissions would be between £136 million and £483 million per year.

“The UK is one of the last global regions to introduce shore connections at its ports and it will take industry collaboration and innovation to bring forward the introduction of portside electricity in a quick and sustainable manner. There is now a global standard for shore connections and it is up to our ports now to catch up with the global norm and demonstrate that we truly believe in a cleaner, healthier future,” says Peter Selway, Marine Segment Marketing Manager at Schneider Electric.

While health conscious countries like the UK are employing proactive policies to help curb the dangerous impacts of air pollution and the ongoing efforts to alleviate roadside toxic fumes is indeed noble, the long-term impact of the shipping industry should not be ignored.

Globally, the partnership between the Port of Seattle and the shipping industry has seen annual CO2 emissions being cut by up to 29 per cent annually in the port, with financial savings of up to 26 per cent per port call. Meanwhile, shore connection capabilities have been mandatory for all ships at berth in California since 2010 and by 2020, at least 80 per cent of berths have to be equipped with shore connection technology.

The shipping industry itself has been receptive to plugging in at port and Schneider Electric’s technology has assisted La Meridionale to achieve a 95 per cent reduction in its berthside emissions. Danish ferry group Scandlines, meanwhile, has seen an overall energy saving of between 10-14 per cent in its equipped vessels.

“It is time now to adopt a new way of thinking and embrace, as an industry, the benefits that shore connections and portside electricity can bring quickly and cost-effectively. We are fortunate enough to have the technology at hand and we must put it to good use,” Selway concludes.

container port Southampton

Southampton on the list of top container growth in 2016

During 2016 126 ports handled more than 1 million teu containers.

According to DynaLiners report entitled millionaires roundup, 82 ports had experienced growth in the year with 5 ports showing growth of 25% or more.

These ports were Chittagong, Bangladesh (26%), London (26%), Salalah, Oman (29%), Tangshan, China (27%) and Southampton (26%).

14 ports reached over 10m teu. These included Antwerp, Belgium; Busan, South Korea; Dubai, UAE; Hong Kong; Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Port Kelang, Malaysia; Rotterdam, Netherlands; Singapore and Tianjin, Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Ningbo, Qingdao and Shanghai, China.

New entrants to the table included Itajai with 1,104,100 teu and growth of 12%, Izmit with 1,143,000 teu and growth of 16%, Port Qasim with 1,124,000 teu and growth of 16% and Qinzhou with 1,138,000 teu and growth of 24%.

No ports dropped out of the table but 43 saw negative growth on 2015, of which Freeport (Bahamas) recorded the largest decline of -14%. Lagos and Port Said each had a 12% decline, Santos had a 10% decline, Tanjung Pelepas had a 9% decline, Hai Phong had an 8% decline, Lianyungang had a 7% decline, Long Beach had a 6% decline and Kingston had a 5% decline.

The total teu handled by the ports was 589,350,800, with other ports not on the list accounting for 117,649,200.

China topped the list of teu growth by country in 2016, maintaining its position from 2015.

The Far East, North Europe and North America retained position one, two and three respectively from 2015, with the Far East seeing a 2% YoY growth, 3% for North Europe and 1% for North America.

Of the terminal operators included in the data, PSA remained in first place with 56,300,000 teu, growing 6%, Hutchinson Ports also maintained second place but with a 3% dip in growth, followed by APM Terminals also staying at number three with a 3% growth. DP World was fourth, keeping its rank but with zero growth, Cosco Shipping Ports also stayed at number five with a 4% growth.

The report took into account full and empty, loaded and discharged, including transhipment containers. It noted that “Chinese port statistics often include (large) unknown quantities of containerised river cargo. Without these, some of them might even not qualify for millionaire status.”

• Source: Port Strategy